Bahiagrass pasture with grazing cattle

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The Alabama Row Crops Short Course would not be possible without the support of sponsors like you. There are three levels of sponsorship: Gold, Silver, and Bronze.

  • Gold Sponsorship – $3000
    • Includes space for an information booth to interact with participants and 10 minutes in the program to provide an update
  • Silver Sponsorship – $1000
    • Includes space for an information booth to interact with participants and 5 minutes during the social event to provide an update
  • Bronze Sponsorship – $500
    • Includes space for an information booth to interact with participants

Become a Sponsor

Sponsorships can be made through the Alabama Extension Store at www.aces.edu/go/donate. To become a sponsor, enter the amount that corresponds to the level of sponsorship that you wish to do and click “Add To Cart.” You will then need to complete a form with the following information:

  • Purpose of the donation or sponsorship: Type one of the following levels into the space provided.
    • Alabama Row Crops Short Course Gold Sponsor
    • Alabama Row Crops Short Course Silver Sponsor
    • Alabama Row Crops Short Course Bronze Sponsor
  • Name of your Extension contact who is handling the donation or sponsorship: Eros Francisco
  • Email address of your Extension contact: ezf0034@auburn.edu

Click “Continue” and then click “Checkout” to make the payment via a credit card.

Maximum profits in small grains production depend on an effective and economical insect management program.

To plan such a program, producers must determine whether insects are present and the amount of damage being done. The “tools of technology” available in managing small grain insects are cultural practices, the selective use of insecticides, insect scouting, transgenic varieties, and beneficial arthropods. The effectiveness of these tools can be maximized when used by all growers over a large area. Insect management does not mean reduction of the insect population to zero; instead it means a reduction below the level of economic damage.

This guide was compiled by both current and former Extension entomologists, plant pathologists, weed scientists, and a pesticide education specialist.

 

Download the Small Grains IPM Guide, IPM-0458.

IPM guides for other crops as well as a general IPM overview, safety recommendations and directions for submitting samples can be found in the Integrated Pest Management Guides.

 

For questions about accessibility or to request accommodations, contact Extension Communications and Marketing at 334-844-5696 or extcomm@aces.edu.

Maximum profits in soybean production depend on an effective and economical insect management program.

To plan such a program, producers must determine whether insects are present and the amount of damage being done. The “tools of technology” available in managing soybean insects are cultural practices, the selective use of insecticides, insect scouting, transgenic varieties, and beneficial arthropods. The effectiveness of these tools can be maximized when used by all growers over a large area. Insect management does not mean reduction of the insect population to zero; instead it means a reduction below the level of economic damage.

This guide was compiled by both current and former Extension entomologists, plant pathologists, weed scientists, and a pesticide education specialist.

 

Download the Soybean IPM Guide, IPM-0413.

IPM guides for other crops as well as a general IPM overview, safety recommendations and directions for submitting samples can be found in the Integrated Pest Management Guides.

 

For questions about accessibility or to request accommodations, contact Extension Communications and Marketing at 334-844-5696 or extcomm@aces.edu.

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