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This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP.

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*This is an excerpt from Top Ten Most Wanted Bugs in Your Garden, ANR-2283.

Aliases: fairy fly, chalcid

Wanted For: Parasitizing the eggs and larvae of cutworms, cabbage loopers, codling moths, tomato hornworms, as well as all stages of aphids, whiteflies, scales, and other pests.

Family History: These tiny, notorious wasps lay their eggs on or inside of pests or insect eggs and the larvae eat the pest. Can be tracked by the tell-tale signs they leave behind, such as tiny, white cocoons on caterpillars or aphid mummies—the tan, dried up husks of aphids stuck to a leaf.

Sightings: Suspected of foraging for nectar on tiny flowers such as alyssum, yarrow, tansy, and clover.

 

Read more about the Top Ten Most Wanted Bugs in Your Garden.

Download a PDF of Top Ten Most Wanted Bugs in Your Garden, ANR-2283.

Maximum profits in grain sorghum production depend on an effective and economical insect management program.

To plan such a program, producers must determine whether insects are present and the amount of damage being done. The “tools of technology” available in managing grain sorghum insects are cultural practices, the selective use of insecticides, insect scouting, transgenic varieties, and beneficial arthropods. The effectiveness of these tools can be maximized when used by all growers over a large area. Insect management does not mean reduction of the insect population to zero; instead it means a reduction below the level of economic damage.

This guide was compiled by both current and former Extension entomologists, plant pathologists, weed scientists, and a pesticide education specialist.

Download the Grain Sorghum IPM Guide. 

IPM guides for other crops as well as a general IPM overview, safety recommendations and directions for submitting samples can be found in the Integrated Pest Management Guides.

For questions about accessibility or to request accommodations, contact Extension Communications and Marketing at 334-844-5696 or extcomm@aces.edu.

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