Retained foreleg diagram
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The first step in providing assistance during calving  is assessing the problem. There are several common situations encountered when delivering a calf. Sometimes a calf can have its head underneath both forelegs. The head must be placed on top of the forelegs, and then delivery can proceed.

When in doubt, call your veterinarian. The outcome is always more favorable if assistance is provided sooner rather than later. Waiting too long unnecessarily risks the life of the cow or heifer and her calf.

Read here to learn more about how to manage a successful calving season.

Download a PDF of Managing a Successful Calving Season, ANR-1403.

The first step in providing assistance during calving  is assessing the problem. There are several common situations encountered when delivering a calf. Sometimes a calf can have its head turned to the side during delivery. The neck must be straightened out and the head placed on top of the forelegs for delivery to proceed.

When in doubt, call your veterinarian. The outcome is always more favorable if assistance is provided sooner rather than later. Waiting too long unnecessarily risks the life of the cow or heifer and her calf.

Read here to learn more about how to manage a successful calving season.

Download a PDF of Managing a Successful Calving Season, ANR-1403.

 

*This is an excerpt of Animal, Forage, and Feed Management Following a Flood Event, ANR-2536.

  • Even if hay was not submerged in water, heavy rains will likely decrease the quality of hay stored outside or on the ground.
  • Hay that is submerged by as little as 1 foot has limited usable forage remaining.
  • The amount of rotted hay, mold, and possible contaminants in flooded hay make it of little value and potentially a hazard to livestock.
  • Hay that has less than 1 foot submersion may still have some usable forage, but it should be used with caution and should be fed only to cattle.
  • For hay submerged less than 1 foot of water, feed the dry hay but do not force the cattle to consume the wet and rotting portion of the bale.
  • Hay that was flooded in storage barns should
    be removed as soon as possible to prevent hay fires. This hay will begin to heat and spontaneous combustion is a possibility.
  • Hay that is not fit for livestock should be disposed of by burning or composting it.

 

Download a PDF of Animal, Forage, and Feed Management Following a Flood Event, ANR – 2536.