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Maximum profits in soybean production depend on an effective and economical insect management program.

To plan such a program, producers must determine whether insects are present and the amount of damage being done. The “tools of technology” available in managing soybean insects are cultural practices, the selective use of insecticides, insect scouting, transgenic varieties, and beneficial arthropods. The effectiveness of these tools can be maximized when used by all growers over a large area. Insect management does not mean reduction of the insect population to zero; instead it means a reduction below the level of economic damage.

This guide was compiled by both current and former Extension entomologists, plant pathologists, weed scientists, and a pesticide education specialist.

 

Download the Soybean IPM Guide, IPM-0413.

IPM guides for other crops as well as a general IPM overview, safety recommendations and directions for submitting samples can be found in the Integrated Pest Management Guides.

 

For questions about accessibility or to request accommodations, contact Extension Communications and Marketing at 334-844-5696 or extcomm@aces.edu.

Maximum profits in row crop production depend on successful and accurate diagnosis of disease or insect damage. An accurate diagnosis can aid farmers in the implementation of an effective integrated pest management program. One important part of diagnosis is plant tissue samples to help identify issues and determine best management options.

The Alabama Cooperative Extension System supports two plant diagnostic laboratories. One is at Auburn University; the other is located in Birmingham at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens.

The Plant Diagnostic Laboratory at Auburn University provides three services: plant problem diagnosis, soil nematode analysis, and insect identification. Plant problems sent to the lab include diseases, nematode injury, insect damage, chemical damage, environmental stress, horticultural and agronomic problems, or wildlife damage.

Plant samples at the Auburn University Plant Diagnostic Lab are initially examined by a plant pathologist. Some samples may then be referred to Extension specialists in entomology, agronomy, horticulture, or wildlife.

In addition to plant problem diagnosis, soil nematode analysis, and insect identification, plants are also received for identification. These plants are referred to agronomists and horticulturists who typically respond to the inquiries.

 

Download Submitting Samples for Diagnosis, Analysis and Identification, IPM-1294. 

 

IPM guides for other crops as well as a general IPM overview, safety recommendations and directions for submitting samples can be found at Integrated Pest Management Guides.

 

For questions about accessibility or to request accommodations, contact Extension Communications and Marketing at 334-844-5696 or extcomm@aces.edu.

Hemp is a new crop for Alabama and for the United States. With the 2014 Farm Bill’s Pilot Program, many states began producing hemp for fiber, grain, or flower. Additionally, the 2018 Farm Bill listed hemp as an agricultural commodity, leading to even more states, including Alabama, signing on to grow hemp in 2019. There has been little to no research done on hemp in the last several decades so the available information is limited. We are constantly learning about the insects, weeds, and diseases that infest hemp and how to control them.

This guide is the most up-to-date information available to Alabama Extension, but recommendations are changing as more is learned. Please contact the Alabama Cooperative Extension System if you have questions concerning pest identification or management.

These products have been reviewed by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI) and Alabama Extension and appear to meet all the criteria for legal use in Alabama.

ADAI and Alabama Extension make no recommendations for the use of pesticides on hemp. This list is not an endorsement of any kind for any of the products listed, nor does it ensure the safety or efficacy of these products when applied to hemp in Alabama.

 

Download the Hemp Pest Management Guide, ANR-2635.

IPM guides for other crops as well as a general IPM overview, safety recommendations and directions for submitting samples can be found in the Integrated Pest Management Guides.

For questions about accessibility or to request accommodations, contact Extension Communications and Marketing at 334-844-5696 or extcomm@aces.edu.

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