Great horned owl (Bubo virginianus)
Great horned owl (Bubo virginianus)

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*This is an excerpt from Common Birds of Prey in Alabama, ANR – 1386

Found primarily in large forests, barred owls are easily identified by the brown streaks visible on their bellies and their lack of ear tufts. These birds also have dark eyes, which distinguish them from most other eastern owls, which have yellow eyes.

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*This is an excerpt from Common Birds of Prey in Alabama, ANR – 1386.

Found year round throughout Alabama, Cooper’s hawks are similar to sharp-shinned hawks. Averaging around one pound, Cooper’s hawks are larger than sharp-shinned hawks. Almost identical in coloration, Cooper’s hawks can be distinguished from sharpshinned hawks by their longer, rounder tails, larger heads and straighter wings. As with sharp-shinned hawks, Cooper’s hawks eat mostly smaller songbirds and are found in and around forests.

Read here to learn more about common birds of prey in Alabama.

Download a PDF of Common Birds of Prey in Alabama, ANR – 1386. 

*This is an excerpt from Common Birds of Prey in Alabama, ANR – 1386.

Eastern screech-owls are the smallest owl commonly seen in the eastern United States. Though they vary in color from gray to brown to red, screech-owls can be identified by their small size, ear tufts, and the elaborate patterns that cover their bodies. These birds can be found in most forested habitats in Alabama, particularly open woods or along forest edges.

Read here to learn more about common birds of prey in Alabama.

Download a PDF of Common Birds of Prey in Alabama, ANR – 1386. 

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