Alternative Vegetable IPM Recommendations Slide Chart
Alternative Vegetable IPM Recommendations Slide Chart

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The focus of Microloans is on the financing needs of small, beginning farmer, niche and non-traditional farm operations, such as truck farms, farms participating in direct marketing and sales such as farmers’ markets, CSA’s (Community Supported Agriculture), restaurants and grocery stores, or those using hydroponic, aquaponic, organic and vertical growing methods.

To learn more contact your local office or USDA Service Center to learn more about the programs. You should also be able to locate a listing in the telephone directory in the section set aside for governmental/public organizations under the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Farm Service Agency. The local FSA office staffs are happy to help you and discuss our loan programs with you in more detail.

Read more about microloan services.

The Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (SARE) was authorized as part of the 1985 Farm Bill and first funded in 1988 as LISA (Low-Input Sustainable Agriculture) program. The name was changed to SARE in the early 1990s to reflect the broader scope of the principles of sustainable agriculture and to express the dual mission of research and education.

From its inception, the program’s goal has been to support farmers, researchers, and educators as they explore practices that improve stewardship, profitability, and the social and economic health of farm communities.

The primary tools of the SARE program are grants, which are offered annually to farmers, researchers, educators, non-profits, community based organizations and community activists in the agricultural community. Grants are not the only tools, but grant funds are understood to be the chief lubricant in the development of new approaches and new ideas. SARE seeks out innovation in sustainable agriculture, and rewards grant applicants who offer up interesting, potentially workable ideas. The SARE program also emphasizes outreach and the dissemination of project results so that the grant program will have the widest possible benefits.

SARE’s national outreach office is supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture. It operates under cooperative agreements with the University of Maryland and the University of Vermont (Award Nos. 2007-38640-03953 and 2007-47001-03782) to develop and disseminate information about sustainable agriculture. Guided by a Steering Committee, SARE Outreach maintains the website and publishes a variety of print and electronic resources for farmers, agricultural educators, and consumers. It also hosts SANET-MG, a sustainable agriculture listserv with subscribers from around the globe.

The Home and Market Garden (Urban Farm) IPM Toolkit wheel slide chart is a great tool for urban farmers as well as home and community gardeners interested in vegetable production.

This wheel slide chart has both conventional and organic insecticide listings for nearly 20 different crops. It also has a listing of common insect pests with accompanying images that may help when scouting in garden vegetables.

To receive copy of this wheel slide chart, email Ayanava Majumdar at azm0024@aces.edu.

For growers or gardeners that are looking for organic only options, refer to the Alternative Vegetable IPM Recommendations Slide Chart, which describes the three levels of sustainable integrated pest management practices.

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