Feeding Flood Damaged Hay

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*This is an excerpt of Animal, Forage, and Feed Management Following a Flood Event, ANR-2536.

  • Document all losses of hay as soon as it is safe to do so.
  • Take photos of bales or the place where bales were stored prior to the storm.
  • Write down the number of bales, type and quality of hay, and the estimated weight or size
    (i.e., 4 × 4, 4 × 5, etc.).
  • Contact the Farm Service Agency (FSA) office, and visit them with this information as soon as possible.
  • Eligible hay losses may be covered under the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm- raised Fish Program (ELAP). Find more information at www.fsa.usda.gov.
  • To qualify for the program, hay had to have been baled. The program will not cover hay that was cut and on the ground.
  • This program covers only hay purchased to feed or hay cut to feed. The program does not cover hay that was cut to sell.
  • Document flooded hay versus hay that was rained on.
  • When possible, have an Extension agent or other official help you document your losses.
  • File a notice of loss at the FSA office within 30 days of the loss.

 

Download a PDF of Animal, Forage, and Feed Management Following a Flood Event, ANR – 2536.

*This is an excerpt of Animal, Forage, and Feed Management Following a Flood Event, ANR-2536.

  • Feed that farmers had on hand (including commercial feed and harvested commodities) may be covered by the ELAP program. Farmers need to document the amount and type of feed that was damaged and the type of damage that occurred.
  • Salvaging flooded feed may be possible, but it must be done quickly after a flood event. If feed is stored in bins, remove any dry feed from the top and move to a different area for later use.
  • If possible, remove wet grain from storage containers and spread out to dry in a layer no more than 6 inches deep.
  • Test flooded grains for mycotoxin load. Additional information on mycotoxin testing services can be found at the end of this document.
  • Pelleted feeds may be more difficult to salvage and will begin to degrade once wetted. It is possible to still utilize these feeds in the short-term, but monitor them closely for mold growth or rancidity.

Download a PDF of Animal, Forage, and Feed Management Following a Flood Event, ANR – 2536.

*This is an excerpt of Animal, Forage, and Feed Management Following a Flood Event, ANR-2536.

  • Flooded pastures will likely be severely affected.
  • Winter annuals that were seeded before the flood and are relatively short are unlikely to survive flooding. Larger plants may survive a short period of flooding, but extended submersion will likely kill the forage.
  • Established tall fescue fields can survive 7 to 10 days of flooding. Allow for a recovery period of
    1 to 2 weeks before allowing livestock access to these fields.
  • The ELAP program will also cover losses to pastures, but flooding will need to be documented.
  • Use an aerial map to log the time line of the flood and when waters recede as well as the number of days
    of grazing lost. Your Extension agent or other adviser can help you determine how many grazing days were lost. Grazing days are reimbursed at a rate of $0.94 per day, regardless of livestock species.

Download a PDF of Animal, Forage, and Feed Management Following a Flood Event, ANR – 2536.

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