ACES Publications

Author: Arlie Powell, David Himelrick, William Dozier, et al.
PubID: ANR-0053-F
Title: Fruit Culture in Alabama: Selecting Adapted Varieties
Pages: 12     Balance: 0
ANR-53f SELECTING ADAPTED VARIETIES

ANR-53-F, New April 1999. Arlie Powell, Extension Horticulturist, Professor, David Himelrick, Extension Horticulturist, Professor, William Dozier, Professor, and David Williams, Extension Horticulturist, Associate Professor, all in Horticulture at Auburn University


Fruit Culture in Alabama

Selecting Adapted Varieties

Because hundreds of varieties may be available for a given type of fruit, growers should review varietal information before establishing their planting. Choosing the best varieties can enhance the chances for successful fruit production.

The newly introduced Gala apple variety from New Zealand has a superb flavor and is already proving to be outstanding in Alabama.


Understanding Horticultural Varieties

Within a plant species, such as Prunus persica L. (peach), there are numerous different plant selections or individuals referred to as varieties. More recently, the term cultivar has been introduced to refer to a "cultivated variety," which is different from a botanical variety. If the plant is produced by graftage, it will consist of a scion variety that produces desirable fruit and a rootstock variety that provides the plant's root system. A home gardener may choose to try one or more of the "antique" varieties that are still available. If one just considers the peach, several hundred varieties, or cultivars, are available for use. When one looks at the total fruit picture, literally thousands of varieties may be grown. Therefore, growers should review varietal information before establishing their planting.


Understanding Trueness to Type

When fruit plants are sold, it is generally implied that a plant labeled as being a particular variety is, in fact, that variety. However, in reality, home gardeners often find that when a purchased plant begins producing fruit, which may require at least 2 to 4 years, it is often not the variety they thought they purchased. A mistake like this can be disastrous to a commercial producer, and it can be equally frustrating to home gardeners. Therefore, growers should locate reliable nursery sources who supply top-quality plants that are true-to-name.


Choosing the Correct Varieties

Some varieties are very limited in where they can be successfully grown, while others may be widely adapted. To commercial producers, choosing adapted varieties can be crucial to the long-term success of their operations. Home fruit producers have a little more latitude in selecting varieties because mistakes are not as costly. Nonetheless, selecting the best adapted varieties is still very important for hobby and home producers and has several advantages for them. New varieties are always intriguing to growers, but varieties must be tested for a few years to fully evaluate their adaptation for an area.

Selecting varieties can provide growers with a continuous supply of fresh fruit. For example, if growers want a continuous supply of fresh peaches, they can plant several varieties that are adapted to their area and that ripen at 7- to 10-day intervals throughout the season. Recommended varieties for each area of the state and some of their selection characteristics are listed in Table 1 and Table 2. Fruit-growing regions of Alabama are shown in Figure 1.

Plants may also carry 17- to 20-year patents, much like other patented products. In some cases, such as apples, the preferred varieties are patented and may be more difficult to locate for purchasing. Patented varieties cannot be propagated without a written agreement from the patent holder.

In addition, varieties that are adapted for the area's climate have a better chance of success. Make certain that the area where the fruit plant is to be grown receives at least the level of chilling characteristic of the variety. In other words, a variety of apple that requires 1,000 hours of chilling should not be planted in an area that receives only 850 hours or less. It is just as important to avoid planting low-chilling tree fruit and blueberry selections in a high-chilling area. For example, a 400-hour peach variety should not be planted in central Alabama. This variety will flower early and lose its crop because of freezes. (See Figure 1 for maps of Alabama's chilling zones.)

Information on chilling requirements and other characteristics is provided in Tables 3 through 7.

 Table 1. Suggested Fruit Varieties for Central and North Alabama

Fruit Type Characteristic for Selection Variety

 Tree Fruit

Apple  

 

 

 

 

 

Other apple varieties (by harvest season)

 Spur-type Delicious Red Delicious: Cumberland Spur, Scarlet Spur, Red Chief (Campbell and Mercier strains), Oregon Spur II
Golden Delicious: Goldspur Delicious, Stark's Goldspur Delicious
Nonspur-type Delicious Red Delicious: Early Red One, Sharpe Red
Golden Delicious: Smoothee. Mutsu has excellent quality but may crop lightly because of early flowering and freeze damage. It has sterile pollen and must be interplanted with at least two other varieties.
Super Gold, Lysgolden, and Firm Gold are suggested for trial use.
Early season (summer) harves Gala, Gala sports, and Gingergold are quite good. Mollies Delicious is satisfactory.
Midseason harvest Jonathan: Nured, Jonnee
Late-season harvest Granny Smith, Arkansas Black, Yates (pollinator), Law Rome
Fuji and Fuji sports are suggested for trial use.
Cooking (tart fruit) LauraRed
Pear Resistance to fire blight Hard pear types: Orient, Baldwin, Kieffer
European (French) types: (soft flesh with less grit or stone cells) Ayers, Moonglow, Starking Delicious, Maxine; Warren and Harvest Queen are suggested for trial use.
Asian pear Resistance to fire blight Korean Giant, Hosui, Shinko, Shinseiki, Chojuro, Megeitsu, Daisu Li, and Erishinge are suggested for trial use. Calleryana is the recommended rootstock.
Peach Early season harvest Correll, Surecrop, Sweethaven, Dixired, and Garnet Beauty
Derby is suggested for trial use.
Midseason harvest Redhaven, Norman, Harbrite, Newhaven, Ranger, Jayhaven, Bellaire, Winblo, La Premier, Bounty, Canadian Harmony, Contender, Ruston Red
Late-season harvest Madison, Redkist, Denman, Cresthaven, Biscoe, Monroe, Autumn Glo, Encore, Finale
Bobeva and Flameprince are suggested for trial use.
White flesh color Carolina Belle, Belle of Georgia, Summer Pearl
Central Alabama use only Majestic, Stagg, Harvester, Jefferson
Loring, Redskin, Sunprince, Summerprince, Fairtime; Dixiland should be used only in warmest locations because of crop loss from freezes.
Carogem and Fireprince are suggested for trial use.
 Nectarine Midseason harvest Summer Beaut, Sunglo
Late-season harvest Redgold
Trial use (in order of ripening) Carolina Red, Earliscarlet, Hardired, Harko, Rose Princess (white), Flavortop
Central Alabama use only Juneglo, Durbin, Karla Rose
 Plum Order of ripening Mayripe (green plum only), Shirley, Morris, AU Rosa, AU Rubrum, Crimson
Central Alabama use only Methley, AU Producer, AU Roadside (home orchard only)
Green plums: Bruce, Segundo, Robusto
Trial use (in order of ripening) AU Cherry (home orchard only), Ruby Sweet, Explorer
 Cherry  Sour cherry (Sweet cherries are poorly adapted.) Montmorency
 Oriental persimmon, Diospyros kaki Astringent type Tanenashi, Eureka, Hachiya (From Birmingham north, these varieties are subject to winter freeze damage).
Nonastringent type* Most varieties (such as Fuyu) are too cold-tender north of Birmingham but can survive and fruit during mild winters.*
 Pomegranate Wonderful
 Fig Eastern Brown Turkey, Celeste, Alma, Kadota
LSU Purple and LSU Gold are suggested for trial use.
Plants of all varieties will winter-freeze frequently but will regrow and resume fruiting until frozen again.

 Small Fruit

Grape** Pierces-Disease-resistant bunch grapes Miss Blanc, Miss Blue, MidSouth, Conquistador, Suwanee, Daytona
Bunch grapes Fredonia, Niagara
Seedless varieties: (North Alabama use only) Reliance, Saturn, Venus, Mars
Catawba, Delaware, De Chaunac, Chancellor, Seyval, and Villard Blanc are suggested for trial use.
Muscadine grapes (fresh fruit) Female types: Black Beauty, Supreme, Darlene, Fry, Loomis, Summit, Sweet Jenny, Black Fry. (Fry and Black Fry are often hurt by winter freezes in North Alabama).
Perfect types: (Use as pollinators for female varieties.) Triumph, Ison, Nesbitt, Carlos, Cowart, Granny Val, Pineapple
Muscadine grapes (wine production) Female types: Higgins (often hurt by winter freezes in North Alabama)
Perfect types: Golden Isles, Magnolia, Noble, Welder, Carlos
 Blackberry Trailing Young, Boysen, Gem, Flint
Chester and Hull are for trial use only.
Thorny erect Kiowa, Shawnee, Choctaw, Cheyenne
Rosborough and Womack are suggested for trial use.
Thornless erect Navaho may be fine in some locations but has a number of problems associated with plant longevity.
Because of superior disease resistance, Arapaho is recommended over Navaho, although the latter has somewhat better flavor.
 Raspberry Latham, Southland, Dormanred
Heritage and Bababerry are suggested for trial use.
Blueberry  Highbush Earliblue, Bluecrop, Jersey are best for North Alabama.
Rabbiteye Tifblue, Premier, Brightwell, Centurian, and Powderblue
Climax can be used in central Alabama but usually suffer more crop loss from late freezes than other varieties do and benefit from freeze protection. Austin is suggested for trial use in central Alabama.
 Strawberry Sunrise, Cardinal, Earliglow, Allstar, Albritton
Chandler is the preferred variety for growing on plastic;
Camorosa is suggested for trial use.
Kiwifruit*** Central Alabama use only**** Female type: Hayward
Male types: Use at least two different pollinator varieties in a planting. Tomuri (the best), Matua, M-51 (an unnamed New Zealand selection). Freeze damage appears to be more of a problem for M-51 when plants are young than for other pollinators.
*Refer to Table 2 for more information on nonastringent persimmon varieties.
**Pierces Disease kills bunch grape vines planted south of Birmingham except for resistant varieties.
***Some hardy kiwifruit types break dormancy too early and are prone to freeze damage.
****Experience over the past 10 years shows kiwifruit can generally withstand winter temperatures from Chilton County southward. Some smooth-skinned, hardy kiwifruit types break dormancy too early and are prone to freeze damage.

 Table 2. Suggested Fruit Varieties for South Alabama

 Fruit Type  Characteristic for Selection  Variety

 Tree Fruit

 Apple* Red color Brogden, Anna
Golden color Wiregrass, Dorsett Golden
Delicious varieties Varieties of Red and Golden Delicious can be grown in south Alabama but will usually perform more poorly than in northern counties because of milder winters.
Pollinizer (Plant one or more red types with one or more golden types.) Use Dorsett Golden as pollinizer for Anna. Anna and Dorsett Golden are only for extreme southern counties.
Gala, Gala sports, Fuji and Fuji sports are selections with somewhat lower chilling requirements that are suggested for trial in southern counties.
 Pear Resistance to fire blight Hard pear types: Orient, Baldwin, Kieffer;
Hood and Pineapple (also hard pear types) usually flower too early and suffer more freeze loss but produce fruits that are quite good for processing. Their use should be limited to southernmost counties.
European (French) types: (soft flesh with less grit or stone cells) Moonglow; Warren is suggested for trial use.
 Asian pear Resistance to fire blight (trial use) Korean Giant, Hosui, Shinko, Shinseiki, Megeitsu, Daisu Li, Chojuro, and Erishinge are suggested for trial use.
Ya Li and Seuri flower too early in more northern counties but are worth trial in southern counties. Calleryana is the preferred rootstock.
 Peach Early season harvest Empress, Goldprince, June Gold, Brighton, Juneprince, Sentinel
Regal, Delta, Gala, and Texroyal are early varieties suggested for trial use.
Midseason harvest Harvester, Newhaven, Sunland, La Feliciana, Majestic, Fireprince, Winblo, Stagg, Loring, Bounty, Summergold, Finale
Late-season harvest Ruston Red, Dixiland, Sunprince, Redskin, Monroe, Sweet Sue, Marqueen, Fairtime
Low chilling varieties (in order of ripening) Flordaglobe, Flordaking, Texstar, Flordacrest, La Pecher, Rio Grande, Sun Grand, La Festival. Use these varieties in extreme South Alabama (southern two-thirds of Houston, Baldwin and Mobile Counties).
White flesh color (in order of ripening) Starlite, Scarlet Pearl, La White, Carolina Belle, Belle of Georgia, Summer Pearl
Nectarine Early season harvest Mayfire, Carolina Red, Sunfre, Durbin**
Midseason harvest Juneglo, Earliscarlet**, Summer Beaut, Sunglo**, Rose Princess (white)**
Late-season harvest Redgold**
Low chilling varieties (in order of ripening) Sundollar, Sunlite, Sunsplash, and Sungem are suggested for trial in extreme South Alabama.
Karla Rose (white) has superb eating quality but has fruit split, bacterial leaf, and fruit spot problems some years.
Plum, Japanese Dessert type  Shirley, Morris, AU Rosa, AU Rubrum, AU Producer, Crimson
Methley, AU Cherry, AU Roadside are okay for home use.
Bruce, Segundo, and Robusto are only of value as green plums. Bruce has poor tree longevity.
Ruby Sweet and Explorer are suggested for trial use.
Oriental persimmon Diospyros kaki Astringent type Tanenashi, Eureka, Hachiya
Nonastringent type Fuyugaki (Fuyu) and Jiro
Use Gailey as a pollinator to eliminate excessive fruit shedding of Fuyu.
Izu and Matsumoto Wase Fuyu are suggested for trial planting where freezes limit use of Fuyu.
 Pomegranate Wonderful
 Fig Eastern Brown Turkey, Celeste, Alma, Kadota
LSU Purple and LSU Gold are suggested for trial use.

 Small Fruit

Grape*** Pierces-Disease-resistant bunch grapes Miss Blanc, Miss Blue, MidSouth, Suwanee, Daytona, Conquistador
Bunch grapes Fredonia, Miss Blue, MidSouth, Niagara;
Catawba, Delaware, Interlaken Seedless, De Chaunac, Chancellor, Seyval, Villard Blanc are suggested for trial use.
Daytona, Suwanee, Conquistador are suggested for home use.
Muscadine grapes (fresh fruit) Female types: Black Beauty, Supreme, Darlene, Fry, Loomis, Summit, Sweet Jenny, Black Fry. Fry and Black Fry are often hurt by winter freezes in North Alabama.
Perfect types: (Use as pollinators for female varieties.) Triumph, Ison, Nesbitt, Carlos, Cowart, Granny Val, Pineapple
Muscadine grapes (wine production) Female types: Higgins (often hurt by winter freezes in North Alabama)
Perfect types: Golden Isles, Magnolia, Noble, Welder, Carlos
 Blackberry Trailing Young, Boysen, Gem, Flint
Thorny erect Kiowa, Shawnee, Choctaw, Cheyenne
Rosborough and Womack are suggested for trial use.
Thornless erect Navaho may be fine in some locations but has a number of problems associated with plant longevity.
Because of superior disease resistance, Arapaho is recommended over Navaho, although the latter has somewhat better flavor.
 Raspberry Latham, Southland, Dormanred
Heritage and Bababerry are suggested for trial use.
 Blueberry Southern highbush Pearl River, Magnolia, Jubilee, Summit, and Biloxi are suggested for trial use.
Rabbiteye Climax, Brightwell, Premier, Tifblue, Powderblue, Centurian. Austin is suggested for trial use.
Beckyblue is suggested for home use in extreme southern counties and southern and central counties if freeze protection is used.
Woodard is suggested for home use in southern counties.
Climax, Beckyblue, and Woodard are more susceptible to crop loss from late freezes because of early flowering.
 Strawberry Earliglow, Albritton, Allstar, Cardinal for matted row.
Chandler is the preferred variety for growing on plastic; Camorosa is suggested for trial use.

 Subtropical and Exotic Fruit

 Satsuma Preferred varieties and rootstock Owari, Kimbrough, Armstrong Early
Bud satsumas on Poncirus trifoliata (Trifoliate orange) rootstock. Flying Dragon, a dwarf form of trifoliate orange, is suggested for home use and trial use commercially. Brown Select is suggested for trial planting.
Tangerine and hybrids**** Preferred varieties and rootstock Robinson, Clementine, Nova, Page, Lee, Osceola, Sunburst, Orlando tangelo, Ambersweet (sold as an orange and is self-fruitful)
Bud tangerines on Poncirus trifoliata (Trifoliate orange) rootstock or Flying Dragon for home use.
Lemon Preferred variety Meyer
Limequat Preferred variety Eustis
Kumquat Preferred varieties  Nagami, Meiwa, Marumi. Meiwa is sweet; others are tart but become sweeter when ripe.
Calamondin Preferred variety Calamondin
Kiwifruit*****   Female type: Hayward
Male types: Use at least two different pollinator varieties in a planting. Tomuri (the best), Matua, M-51 (an unnamed New Zealand selection). Freeze damage appears to be more of a problem for M-51 when plants are young than for other pollinators. Freeze protection is necessary. Lack of winter chilling causes light cropping in southern counties.
*Red and Golden Delicious varieties as listed in Table 1 for central Alabama can be planted, but lack of winter chilling usually results in below-par performance.
**Use these varieties of nectarines only in higher chilling areas.
***Pierces Disease kills bunch grape vines planted south of Birmingham except for resistant varieties.
****Except for Clementine tangerine and tangerine hybrids, citrus varieties listed are self-fruitful and do not require cross-pollination. For more detail on varieties, see Extension publication ANR-603, "Citrus for Southern and Coastal Alabama."
*****Experience over the past 10 years shows kiwifruit can generally withstand winter temperatures from Chilton County southward. Some smooth-skinned, hardy kiwifruit types break dormancy too early and are prone to freeze damage.

 Table 3. Chilling Characteristics of Fruit Varieties Listed in Tables 1 and 2

Fruit Type and Variety

Chilling Hours

Flower Bud Leaf Bud
Apple All common varieties (Red and Golden
Delicious)
900 to 1,100 900 to 1,100
Fuji, Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith 700 to 900* 700 to 900*
Anna, Dorsett Golden 250 to 350 250 to 350
Pear, common (hard) Hood, Pineapple 450* 450*
Baldwin 650 650
Orient, Kieffer 750* 750*
Pear, European hybrids Moonglow 800* 800*
Ayers 950* 950*
Maxine 950+* 950+*
Starking Delicious 950+* 950+*
Warren 950+* 950+*
Harvest Queen 950+* 950+*
Asian pear Housi, Shinko, Korean Giant, and other varieties** 600 to 900* 600 to 900*
Oriental persimmon, astringent Eureka, Tanenashi, Hachiya 400 to 700* 400 to 700*
Oriental persimmon,
nonastringent
Fuyu 400* 400*
Matsumoto Wase Fuyu 400* 400*
Izu 400* 400*
Gailey (used as pollinator for Fuyu) 400* 400*
Fig, common Celeste 550* 550*
Eastern Brown Turkey 400* 400*
Alma 500* 500*
Kadota 600* 600*
LSU Purple 450* 450*
Bunch grape, European hybrids De Chaunac, Chancellor,
Seyval, Villard Blanc
300 to 500* 300 to 500*
Bunch grape, American and hybrids Fredonia, Niagara, Reliance,
Saturn, Venus, Mars,
Miss Blanc, Miss Blue,
MidSouth, Conquistador,
Suwanee, Daytona
200 to 600* 200 to 600*
Muscadine grape Fry, Black Beauty,
Summit, Sweet Jenny,
Black Fry, Carlos, Nesbitt,
Cowart, Granny Val
200 to 600* 200 to 600*
Blackberry Young 500* 500*
Boysen 600* 600*
Gem 450* 450*
Flint 500* 500*
Shawnee 700* 700*
Choctaw 700* 700*
Cheyenne 600* 600*
Womack 500* 500*
Rosborough 400* 400*
Navaho 750* 750*
Arapaho 750* 750*
Blueberry, highbush Earliblue 1,000* 1,000*
Bluecrop 1,000* 1,000*
Jersey 1,000* 1,000*
Blueberry, southern highbush Georgiagem 550 550
Cape Fear 600 600
Gulf Coast 500 500
Blueberry, rabbiteye Tifblue 650 650
Premier 650 650
Brightwell 600 600
Centurian 700 700
Powderblue 650 650
Austin 600* 600*
Climax 550 550
Beckyblue 450 450
Woodard 450 450
Kiwifruit Hayward (female)*** 1,000 400
Matua (male) 600* 400*
Tomuri (male) 600* 400*
M-51 (male) 600* 400*
*Estimated values
**Accurate chilling requirement has not been determined.
***Plants will grow with only 400 hours of chilling, but 1,000 hours are needed for optimum female flower production and cropping.

 

 Table 4. Characteristics of Yellow-Fleshed Peach Varieties Listed in Tables 1 and 2*

Variety Ripening Season
(Days before Elberta)**

 Chilling Hours

Stone Freeness
Flower Bud Leaf Bud
Flordaglobe 61 450 450 Cling
Goldcrest 60 650 650 Semifree
Regal (CVN-1B3) 56 700 700 Semifree
Empress 52 650 650 Cling
Correll 51 850 850 Cling
Flordaking 51 400 400 Cling
Goldprince 47 650 650 Cling
June Gold 47 650 650 Cling
Texstar 45 500 500 Semifree
Derby 45 850 850 Semifree
Surecrop 43 1,000 1,000 Cling
Sweethaven 42 850 850 Semifree
Summerprince 42 850 850 Semifree
Dixired 41 1,000 1,000 Cling
Flordacrest 41 425 425 Semifree
Delta (CVN-1-A) 40 550 550 Cling
La Pecher 39 450 450 Semifree
Maygold 39 650 650 Cling
Garnet Beauty 38 850 850 Semifree
Juneprince 35 650 650 Semifree
Texroyal 34 600 600 Free
Brighton 34 750 750 Semifree
GaLa 33 700 700 Semifree
Sentinel 32 850 850 Semifree
Redhaven 28 950 950 Semifree
Harbrite 26 850 850 Free
Norman 26 850 900 Free
Rio Grande 25 450 450 Free
Sun Grande 25 950 450 Free
Ranger 24 900 900 Free
Harvester 22 750 750 Free
Newhaven 22 850 850 Free
Cary Mac 22 750 750 Free
Sunland 21 750 750 Free
Bellaire 20 950 950 Free
La Feliciana 20 550 550 Free
La Festival 20 450 450 Free
Jayhaven 18 850 850 Free
Fireprince 17 850 850 Free
Hawthorne 17 600 600 Free
Carogem 17 950 950 Free
Majestic 16 800 800 Free
Winblo 13 800 800 Free
Bounty 12 800 800 Free
Loring 12 750 750 Free
La Premier 12 1,050 1,050 Free
Legend 12 850 850 Free
Canadian Harmony 10 850 850 Free
Summergold 10 750 750 Free
Contender 9 1,050 1,050 Free
Finale 8 750 750 Free
Madison 7 850 850 Free
Stagg 7 850 850 Free
Denman 6 850 850 Free
Biscoe 3 850 850 Free
Cresthaven 3 850 850 Free
Dixiland 3 750 750 Free
Ruston Red 3 850 850 Free
Sunprince 3 800 800 Free
Redskin 2 750 750 Free
  (Days after Elberta)**      
Jefferson 3 850 850 Free
Autumnglo 6 850 850 Free
Monroe 6 850 850 Free
Encore 7 850 850 Free
Sweet Sue 8 850 850 Free
Bobeva 10 900 900 Free
Marqueen 11 750 750 Free
Flameprince 12 850 850 Free
Fairtime 30 750 750 Free
*Varieties are listed in order of ripening from earliest to latest based on days before or after the Elberta variety.
**Normal first harvest dates for Elberta are as follows: July 10 (South Alabama), July 20 (central Alabama), and July 30 (North Alabama).

 

  Table 5. Characteristics of White-Fleshed Peach Varieties Listed in Tables 1 and 2*

Variety Ripening Season
(Days before Elberta)**

Chilling Hours

Stone Freeness
Flower Bud Leaf Bud
Starlite 55 650 650  Semicling
Scarlet Pearl 47 750 750  Semifree
Southern Pearl 38 650 650  Free
La White 27 650 650  Free
Carolina Belle 18 750 750  Free
 Belle of Georgia  3  850  950  Free
Summer Pearl 3 850 850  Free
*Varieties are listed in order of ripening from earliest to latest based on days before or after the Elberta variety.
**Normal first harvest dates for Elberta are as follows: July 10 (South Alabama), July 20 (central Alabama), and July 30 (North Alabama).

 

 Table 6. Characteristics of Nectarine Varieties Listed in Tables 1 and 2*

Variety Ripening Season
(Days before Elberta)**

Chilling Hours

Stone Freeness
Flower Bud Leaf Bud
 Mayfire  63  650  650  Cling
 Sundollar  60  400  400  Cling
 Sunlite  55  450  450  Cling
 Sunsplash  54  450  450  Cling
 Sungem  54  425  425  Cling
 Carolina Red  39  750  750  Semifree
 Juneglo  38  700  700  Semifree
 Sunfre  35  525  525  Semifree
 Juneprincess  35  850  850  Semifree
 Karla Rose***  35  700  700  Semifree
 Durbin  30 850   850  Semifree
 Earliscarlet  28  850  850  Semifree
 Summer Beaut  27  800  800  Free
 Hardired  24  850  850  Free
 Harko  24  850  850  Semifree
 Sunglo  23  850  850  Free
 Rose Princess***  21  850  850  Free
 Flavortop  14  850  850  Free
 Redgold  5  850  850  Free
*Varieties are listed in order of ripening from earliest to latest based on days before or after the Elberta peach variety.
**Normal first harvest dates for Elberta are as follows: July 10 (South Alabama), July 20 (central Alabama), and July 30 (North Alabama).
***White-fleshed

 

 Table 7. Characteristics of Plum Varieties Listed in Tables 1 and 2*

Variety Ripening Season (Days before Elberta)

Chilling Hours**

Color

Flower Bud Leaf Bud Skin Flesh
 Mayripe  52***  750  750  Green to red  Yellow
 Bruce  50***  500  500  Green to red  Yellow to red
 Methley  42  500  500  Red to purple  Deep red
 Robusto  40***  600  600  Bright red  Red
 Shirley  37  750  750  Red to yellow  Yellow
 Segundo  35***  650  650  Yellow to red  Yellow to red
 AU Rubrum  30  700  700  Deep red  Deep red
 Morris  30  700  700  Deep red  Deep red
 AU Rosa  28  650  650  Red  Yellow to red
 AU Cherry  26  650  650  Red  Red
 AU Roadside  22  650  650  Purplish red  Red
 AU Producer  20  600  600  Dark red  Red to yellow
 Ruby Sweet  14  650  650  Reddish bronze  Dark red
 Explorer  10  650  650  Purple  Amber
 Crimson  5  650  650  Bright red  Red
*Varieties are listed in order of ripening from earliest to latest based on days before or after the Elberta peach variety.
**Chilling hours are estimated for some varieties.
***Not very tasty. Best use is at green stage.


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